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Sarah Sutton, LEED-AP
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Waialua, Oahu, Hawai'i

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“Andalusia Farm: The Home of Flannery O’Connor is so pleased to be among the stories of sustainable practice (and aspirations!) included in Sarah Sutton’s new book “Environmental Sustainability at Historic Sites and Museums’. I have acquired some valuable tips and techniques in reading the green stories from my colleague institutions. Anyone working at a historic site will also learn relevant and actionable information as they seek to make their sites more environmentally sustainable.”
    – Elizabeth Wylie,
      Executive Director

Click below for more testimonials.
testimonials

 

Book CoverEnvironmental Sustainability at Historic Sites and Museums is your guidebook to green choices that suit the mission and work at your site. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015)  Click here to purchase.

Going green isn’t a fad anymore; it’s becoming business as usual.

How does environmental sustainability intersect with history work?

  • It helps you share history; connect with your community; and save money. 
  • It supports your mission, your audiences, and your institutional responsibility. 

It impresses visitors.

  • The public, and the regulators, are expecting all organizations, especially charitable ones, to demonstrate environmentally-thoughtful behaviors.
  • What message will your visitors prefer: the one you send using plastic and Styrofoam, with reusable or paper-based containers and a sign about “Protect the Planet and the Past”?

It keeps you out of trouble.

  • Has your city limited energy use or food waste for organizations your size?
  • If you live in a non-drought state, have you been asked yet to manage all your storm water on site?
  • Has your city asked for Payments in lieu of Taxes, or PILOT fees?

Proving how you already reduce your impact on your community can help you meet or deflect those demands.

It connects you to audiences.
Your site has great options for your audience’s interests in historic preservation, redecorating, and new construction. Offer a tour highlighting regionally-distinctive architecture built to use less energy in your climate.

It can save you money.
Using rebates to install LEDs (where appropriate) cuts initial costs as you save on future energy costs.

Support Mission.
Remember, 70°/50% for T/RH is no longer the norm. Not all objects need such precise climate control (and who delivers it consistently anyway?). Energy efficiency upgerades will improve care for the collections while reducing energy costs. There are grants and incentives to help you get started.

   
   
   
   

The Green NonprofitThe Green Nonprofit: The first 52 weeks of your journey.
Charity Channel Press In The Trenches Series, 2013.

Click here to purchase.

See the trailer – yes, trailer – for The Green Nonprofit.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axdOsAk6MMM

Trying to go green, but don’t know where to start?

This is a simple pick-an-activity approach to introducing green to your institutional culture.

Some call this “stealth green”; sometimes that is what’s called for.  After a year of step-by-step practice, you and your team will have reduced your institutional impact on the planet, and done the groundwork for more projects making a big difference for your institution, community and the planet.

This is a little book with a big punch.

 
   

The Green MuseumThe Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Practice
Second Edition (Rowman & Littlefield 2013) By Sarah Brophy (Sutton) & Elizabeth Wylie  Click here to purchase.

  • First edition, 2008, 185 pages, 50% of examples come from the field. 
  • Second edition, 285 pages, 100% of examples come from the field – with programming examples as a major new component. 

How does environmental sustainability intersect with museum work?

  • It supports your mission, your audiences, and your institutional responsibility. 
  • It helps you connect with your community and save money.
  • The public, and the regulators, expect charitable to behave thoughtfully

It keeps you out of trouble. Proving how you already reduce your impact on your community can help you meet or deflect those demands:

  • Has your city limited energy use or food waste for organizations your size?
  • Does it require some sites to manage all your storm water on site?
  • Or have you been asked for Payments in lieu of Taxes, or PILOT fees?

It can save you money.

  • Rebates for LEDs (where appropriate) cuts initial costs as you save on future energy costs.
  • 70°/50% for T/RH is no longer the norm. Not all objects need such precise climate control (and who delivers it consistently anyway?). Energy efficiency upgrades will improve care for the collections while reducing energy costs. There are grants and incentives to help you get started.
 
   

Is Your Museum Grant-Ready?Is Your Museum Grant-Ready?
Assessing your institution’s readiness to attrac
t grants
(AltaMira Press, 2005) By Sarah Brophy (Sutton) & Elizabeth Wylie  Click here to purchase.

An AltaMira/AASLH best-seller, and the go-to book for grants in museums.

For museums starting to apply for grants or re-examining their grant-raising approach.

Is Your Museum Grant-Ready? helps you make the case for your institution and your project, find the right funder, and create a relationship that leads to funding.

From the back cover:

“This book is not just one more guide to grant writing. It is a handbook for the whole organization to guide it through the process of raising its planning, performance, and systems to a new level – one that will support a strong case for philanthropic support.”